Extracellular vesicles – lipids as key components of their biogenesis and functions

Intercellular communication has been known for decades to involve either direct contact between cells or to operate by spreading molecules such as cytokines, growth factors, or lipid mediators. Through the last decade we have begun to appreciate the increasing importance of intercellular communication mediated by extracellular vesicles released by viable cells either from plasma membrane shedding microvesicles, also named microparticles), or from an intracellular compartment (exosomes). Exosomes and microvesicles circulate in all biological fluids and can trigger biological responses at distance. Their effects include a large variety of biological processes such as immune surveillance, modification of tumor microenvironment, or regulation of inflammation. They carry a large set of active molecules, including lipid mediators such as eicosanoids, proteins and nucleic acids, able to modify the phenotype of receiving cells. INSERM researchers highlight the role of the various lipidic pathways involved in the biogenesis and functions of microvesicles and exosomes.

exosomes

Lipid-related partners of exosome and microvesicle biogenesis

Record M, Silvente-Poirot S, Poirot M, Wakelam MJO. (2018) Extracellular vesicles : lipids as key components of their biogenesis and functions. J Lipid Res [Epub ahead of print]. [article]

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